Tuesday, March 5, 2024

Bear crawl shoulder tap

IntermediateBear crawl shoulder tap

The bear crawl shoulder tap is an excellent exercise that will challenge both your coordination and core strength. It requires you to keep a static bear crawl hold while simultaneously tapping your opposite shoulder. This full-body movement not only tests your cardiovascular system, but also activates a wide range of muscles. The bear crawl shoulder tap can be used as a warm-up, or as part of a bodyweight circuit or flow. This exercise is great for both beginners and experienced athletes. Beginners can start with a low-intensity version and gradually increase the intensity as they become more confident. Experienced athletes can use the exercise to challenge their coordination and core strength. It is also great for building muscle endurance and improving balance and agility. The bear crawl shoulder tap is a great way to improve your overall fitness level. It activates a variety of muscle groups while also testing your coordination and core strength. It can be used as a warm-up or part of a bodyweight circuit or flow. This exercise is a great way to challenge yourself and build muscle endurance, balance, and agility.
Type:
Strength
Muscles Used:
Shoulders
Level:
Intermediate
Equipment:
Body Only

Benefits Of This Exercise

  • A full-body movement that tests your cardiovascular system and activates a wide range of muscles
  • Suitable for both beginners and experienced athletes, with the intensity adjustable based on confidence level
  • A great way to improve overall fitness level and build muscle endurance, balance, and agility
  • Cardiovascular and muscular challenge with no added weight
  • Requires greater coordination and shoulder, arm, and core strength than traditional bear crawls
  • Challenges the shoulders, chest, core, legs, arms, and back

Step by Step Instructions For Bear crawl shoulder tap

  1. Assume the starting position by bending down so that your hands are on the ground and your feet are hip-distance apart. Ensure that your shoulders are stacked over your wrists, your knees are bent to 90 degrees, your back is flat, and your abs are engaged. This will be your starting position.
  2. Quickly bring one hand up to tap your opposite-side shoulder, then place that hand back on the floor before repeating the motion on the opposite side. As you tap your shoulder, your body will slightly shift from one side to the other to maintain balance. Try to avoid rocking your hips from side to side.
  3. Continue this tapping motion for the recommended number of repetitions.

Warm Up Tips

  1. Start in a bear crawl position with your hands on the ground and your feet hip-distance apart.
  2. Keep your shoulders stacked over your wrists, your knees bent to 90 degrees, your back flat, and your abs engaged.
  3. Quickly bring one hand up to tap the opposite-side shoulder, then place that hand back on the floor.
  4. Repeat the shoulder taps, alternating sides and maintaining balance by shifting your body slightly from side to side.
  5. Continue for the recommended number of repetitions.

Bear crawl shoulder tap Safety Tips

  1. Ensure proper form: Bend down so that your hands are on the ground and your feet hip-distance apart. Your shoulders should be stacked over your wrists, your knees bent to 90 degrees, your back flat, and abs engaged. This will help maintain proper alignment and reduce the risk of injury.
  2. Avoid rocking hips: While performing the shoulder taps, try to avoid rocking your hips from side to side. This can put unnecessary strain on your lower back and increase the risk of injury. Instead, focus on keeping your core engaged and maintaining a stable position.
  3. Start with low intensity: If you’re a beginner, start with a low-intensity version of the exercise. Gradually increase the intensity as you become more confident and comfortable with the movement. This will help prevent overexertion and reduce the risk of muscle strains or sprains.
  4. Use controlled movements: When tapping your opposite shoulder, ensure that you’re using controlled movements. Avoid jerking or swinging your arm, as this can strain your shoulder joint. Instead, focus on a smooth and controlled motion to engage your muscles effectively.
  5. Listen to your body: Pay attention to how your body feels during the exercise. If you experience any pain or discomfort, stop immediately and consult a healthcare professional. It’s important to listen to your body’s signals and avoid pushing yourself too far, especially if you’re a beginner.
  6. Stay hydrated:

Incorporating Into Other Workouts

One way to incorporate the bear crawl shoulder tap exercise into workouts is by including it in a bodyweight circuit or flow. Here is an example of how it can be incorporated: 1. Warm-up: Start with a dynamic warm-up to prepare your body for exercise. This can include movements such as jumping jacks, high knees, and arm circles. 2. Main Circuit: - Perform 10-15 repetitions of the bear crawl shoulder tap exercise. - Follow it with other bodyweight exercises such as squats, push-ups, lunges, and planks. Perform each exercise for a specific number of repetitions or for a set amount of time. - Repeat the circuit for 2-3 rounds, resting for 30-60 seconds between rounds. 3. Cool-down: Finish the workout with a cool-down routine that includes static stretches for the muscles worked during the circuit. This can help improve flexibility and reduce muscle soreness. By incorporating the bear crawl shoulder tap exercise into a bodyweight circuit, you can reap the benefits of both cardiovascular and muscular challenge. This exercise will engage multiple muscle groups, including the shoulders, chest, core, legs, arms, and back, providing a full-body workout. It can be adjusted to suit different fitness levels, making it suitable for both beginners and experienced athletes.

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