Friday, June 14, 2024

Clean

The Clean exercise is an effective full-body exercise that strengthens the muscles in the legs, hips, back, and arms. It begins with a barbell on the floor close to the shins, with an overhand or hook grip just outside the legs. The first pull involves driving through the heels and extending the knees, while the second pull uses a jumping motion to accelerate the bar upwards. The third pull involves aggressively shrugging and flexing the arms with the elbows up and out, followed by rotating the elbows under the bar and receiving the bar in a front squat position. Finally, the exercise is completed by driving through the heels and rising to a standing position. This exercise is an excellent way to develop strength and power throughout the body.
Type:
Olympic Weightlifting
Muscles Used:
Hamstrings
Level:
Beginner
Equipment:
Barbell

Benefits Of This Exercise

  • The Clean exercise strengthens muscles throughout the body, including the legs, hips, back, and arms.
  • The exercise develops strength and power throughout the body.
  • The exercise requires coordination and balance to complete the full movement.
  • The exercise engages multiple muscle groups at the same time, making it an effective full-body exercise.
  • The exercise can be adjusted to different levels of difficulty, making it suitable for beginners and experienced athletes alike.
  • The exercise can be used as a warm-up for other exercises, or as part of a strength-training routine.

Step by Step Instructions For Clean

  1. Place a barbell on the floor, close to your shins.

    Take an overhand (or hook) grip just outside your legs.

    Lower your hips with the weight focused on your heels.

    Keep your back straight, head facing forward, and chest up.

    Position your shoulders just in front of the bar.

    This will be your starting position.

  2. Begin the first pull by driving through your heels.

    Extend your knees while maintaining the same back angle.

    Keep your arms straight as you move the weight above your knees.

  3. For the second pull, accelerate the bar as it approaches the mid-thigh position.

    Extend through your hips in a jumping motion.

    Use speed to move the bar upward by extending your hips, knees, and ankles.

    There is no need to actively pull through the arms.

    At the end of the second pull, your body should be fully extended, leaning slightly back, and your arms should still be extended.

  4. Transition into the third pull by aggressively shrugging and flexing your arms.

    Keep your elbows up and out.

    At peak extension, aggressively pull yourself down.

    Rotate your elbows under the bar as you descend.

    Receive the bar in a front squat position.

    The depth of the squat depends on the height of the bar at the end of the third pull.

    Rack the bar onto your protracted shoulders, lightly touching your throat with your hands relaxed.

    Continue descending to the bottom squat position to aid in the recovery.

  5. Immediately recover by

Warm Up Tips

  1. Start with a barbell on the floor close to the shins, with an overhand or hook grip just outside the legs.
  2. Lower your hips with the weight focused on the heels, back straight, head facing forward, chest up, and shoulders just in front of the bar. This is your starting position.
  3. Begin the first pull by driving through the heels and extending your knees. Keep your back angle the same and your arms straight.
  4. Move the weight with control as you continue the first pull above the knees.
  5. Next comes the second pull, which is the main source of acceleration for the clean.
  6. As the bar approaches the mid-thigh position, begin extending through the hips.
  7. In a jumping motion, accelerate by extending the hips, knees, and ankles.
  8. Use speed to move the bar upward, there is no need to actively pull through the arms.
  9. At the end of the second pull, your body should be fully extended, leaning slightly back, with the arms still extended.
  10. Transition into the third pull by aggressively shrugging and flexing the arms with the elbows up and out.
  11. At peak extension, aggressively pull yourself down and rotate your elbows under the bar.
  12. Receive the bar in a front squat position, with the bar lightly touching the throat and hands relaxed

Clean Safety Tips

  1. Ensure proper form: When performing the clean exercise, it is crucial to maintain proper form throughout the entire movement. This includes keeping your back straight, head facing forward, chest up, and shoulders just in front of the bar. Failing to maintain proper form can increase the risk of injury.
  2. Start with lighter weights: If you are new to the clean exercise, it is recommended to start with lighter weights until you have mastered the technique. This will allow you to focus on proper form and reduce the risk of straining or injuring your muscles.
  3. Use a spotter or trainer: If you are unsure about your form or technique, it is advisable to have a spotter or trainer present. They can provide guidance, correct any mistakes, and ensure your safety during the exercise.
  4. Warm up properly: Before starting the clean exercise, it is essential to warm up your muscles. This can be done through dynamic stretches, cardio exercises, or light weightlifting. Warming up will increase blood flow to your muscles and help prevent injuries.
  5. Progress gradually: As you become more comfortable and proficient with the clean exercise, you can gradually increase the weight. However, it is important not to rush the progression. Gradually increasing the weight will allow your muscles to adapt and reduce the risk of overexertion or injury.
  6. Listen to your body: Pay attention to any pain or discomfort during the exercise

Incorporating Into Other Workouts

One way to incorporate the Clean exercise into workouts is by including it in a full-body strength training routine. Here's an example of how you can structure a workout incorporating the Clean exercise: 1. Warm up: Begin with a dynamic warm-up that includes exercises like jogging, jumping jacks, and arm circles to increase blood flow and prepare the body for exercise. 2. Compound exercises: Start the workout with compound exercises that target multiple muscle groups. This can include exercises like squats, deadlifts, and bench presses. Perform 3-4 sets of each exercise, with 8-12 repetitions per set. 3. Clean exercise: After completing the compound exercises, move on to the Clean exercise. Perform 3-4 sets of the Clean, with 5-8 repetitions per set. Focus on maintaining proper form and technique throughout each set. 4. Superset: Pair the Clean exercise with another exercise that complements its movement pattern. For example, you can superset the Clean with overhead presses or lunges. Perform 3-4 sets of each superset, with 8-12 repetitions per set. 5. Core exercises: Finish the workout with core exercises that target the abdominal and lower back muscles. This can include exercises like planks, Russian twists, or bicycle crunches. Perform 2-3 sets of each exercise, with 10-15 repetitions per set. 6. Cool down: End the workout with a cool-down routine that includes static stretching exercises

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